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8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)

8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98) 8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)
includes two plastic FlaK 36 8.8cm Anti-aircraft guns, two plastic Gun Crew sprues, two large six-hole bases, one base plug sprue and one Unit card.

The German Army appreciated the heavy 8.8cm FlaK36 anti-aircraft gun as an anti-tank gun. Its ability to knock out any tank at long range was far more interesting to front-line soldiers than its ability to protect their supply lines from Allied bombing raids. As a result, German divisions were often accompanied by Luftwaffe (Air Force) heavy anti-aircraft batteries operating as anti-tank guns. These units were so effective that Allied tank crews soon started referring to any effective anti-tank gun as an '88'. 

Check out the 8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon in the online store here...
Afrika Korps
The German Afrika Korps is a hard-fighting force of tough veteran troops who have won many battles and expect to win many more. Their Panzer III and Panzer IV tanks outclass the British tanks they face, and have been steadily upgraded to maintain their edge over the opposition. Their infantry are organised to have ‘few men, many weapons’, so they pack a ferocious punch whether facing infantry or tanks. These are backed by the famous ‘88’ dual-purpose anti-tank/anti-aircraft gun and the Stuka dive bomber.

Learn more about Afrika Korp here...

8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)

8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98) 8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)
The 8.8 cm Flak 36 (commonly called the eighty-eight) was a German 88 mm anti-aircraft and anti-tank artillery gun from World War II. It was widely used by Germany throughout the war and was one of the most recognised German weapons of that conflict.
8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98) 8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)
The '88' performed well in its original role of an anti-aircraft gun and it proved to be a superb anti-tank gun as well. Its success was due to its versatility: the standard anti-aircraft platform allowed gunners to depress the muzzle below the horizontal, unlike most of its contemporaries. As WW2 progressed, it was becoming increasingly clear that existing anti-tank weapons were unable to pierce the armour of heavier enemy tanks and ground commanders began increasingly to use the 8.8 cm Flak against tanks.
8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98) 8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)
During the North African campaign, Rommel made the most effective use of the weapon, as he lured tanks of the British Eighth Army into traps by baiting them with apparently retreating German panzers. A mere two flak battalions destroyed 264 British tanks in 1941. Repeated high tank loss from well-placed 8.8 cm Flak guns in the battles of Halfaya Pass earned it the nickname "Hellfire Pass".
 8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98) 8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)
By the end of World War 2 Allied soldiers were known to refer to every enemy anti-tank gun as an '88' and every tank a 'Tiger', such was the legend that these pieces of equipment built up.
8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98) 8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)
Contact the customer service team at customerservice@battlefront.co.nz if you have issues with any components.
Plastic FlaK 36 8.8cm AA Gun Sprue (x2)
8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)
Plastic Gun Crew (x2) Large Six-hole Base (x2); Base Plug Sprue (x1)
8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98) 8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)
Unit Card 
8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon 
(x1)
8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon (GBX98)
Click here to learn how to assemble the 8.8cm...

 Click here to learn how to assemble the 8.8cm...

Boot Camp Battle Report
Afrika Korps vs. Desert Rats
To conclude the lessons laid out in the 4th Edition Boot Camp, Phil and James put the theory into practice by playing a 62-point game using the Free For All mission.

Boot Camp Battle Report: Afrika Korps vs. Desert Rats...

Boot Camp Battle Report: Afrika Korps vs. Desert Rats


Last Updated On Monday, April 17, 2017 by Blake at Battlefront