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10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)

10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91) 10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)
includes four plastic 10.5cm guns, four plastic Gun Crew sprues, four large six-hole bases, one plastic base plug sprue and two Unit cards.

The 10.5cm leFH18 light field howitzer is the standard German artillery piece, supporting their attacks and helping drive off enemy counterattacks. Firing a heavier shell than the British 25 pdr gun, it is correspondingly more effective, although less versatile in the anti-tank role. 

Check out the 10.5cm Artillery Battery in the online store here...
Afrika Korps
The German Afrika Korps is a hard-fighting force of tough veteran troops who have won many battles and expect to win many more. Their Panzer III and Panzer IV tanks outclass the British tanks they face, and have been steadily upgraded to maintain their edge over the opposition. Their infantry are organised to have ‘few men, many weapons’, so they pack a ferocious punch whether facing infantry or tanks. These are backed by the famous ‘88’ dual-purpose anti-tank/anti-aircraft gun and the Stuka dive bomber.

Learn more about Afrika Korp here...
10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)

10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)

10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91) 10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)
The 10.5 cm leFH 18 (leichte Feldhaubitze "light field howitzer") was a German light howitzer used in World War II and the standard artillery piece of the Wehrmacht, adopted for service in 1935 and used by all divisions and artillery battalions. A major advance on its predecessor the 10.5 cm leFH 16, the leFH 18 was superior in caliber to its early opponents in the war, with good range and firepower
10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91) 10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)
The leFH 18 improved in most areas on its predecessor, the 10.5 cm leFH 16. A completely new three-point split trail gun carriage provided more stability and increased the traverse to 56 degrees. The sighting mechanism made it easier to fire at moving targets. The heavier recoil of the higher muzzle velocity was counteracted by a new pneumatic recuperator above the barrel, that provided compressed air and liquid in 55 °C to return the gun to firing position after firing. A barrel brake containing a water jacket and a fluid equaliser in the upper carriage also checked the recoil.
10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91) 10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)
The protective shield was a reinforced, tapered shield with flattened sides that could be folded down. The barrel was good for 10,000 to 12,000 shots. The 10.5cm leFH 18 proved an adaptable design, with a total of 28 different variants manufactured.
 10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91) 10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)
While not ideally suited to it, the howitzer could in the right circumstances be effective in anti-tank combat, particularly in the North African Campaign where the motorised batteries of the 44th Artillery Regiment of the 15th Panzer Division played an important role in defeating British armoured units at Sidi Rezegh on 23 November 1941 during Operation Crusader.
10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91) 10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)
Contact the customer service team at customerservice@battlefront.co.nz if you have issues with any components.
Plastic 10.5cm Gun Sprue (x4)
10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)
Plastic Gun Crew Sprue (x4) Large Six-hole Base (x4); Base Plug Sprue (x1)
10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91) 10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)
Unit Cards
Panzer III OP (x1) 10.5cm Artillery Battery (x1)
10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91) 10.5cm Artillery Battery (GBX91)

Boot Camp Battle Report
Afrika Korps vs. Desert Rats
To conclude the lessons laid out in the 4th Edition Boot Camp, Phil and James put the theory into practice by playing a 62-point game using the Free For All mission.

Boot Camp Battle Report: Afrika Korps vs. Desert Rats...

Boot Camp Battle Report: Afrika Korps vs. Desert Rats


Last Updated On Monday, April 17, 2017 by Blake at Battlefront